Masonry’s Egypto-Hermetic 3rd Degree? Part 1

The idea of secret elements embedded within Masonic ritual is a very old one, most famously exemplified in A.E. Waite’s excellent 2 volume set, The Secret Tradition in Freemasonry (1911). There, Waite points to a secret chivalric Christian mystic ceremonial (à la the C.B.C.S.) within the Masonic degree structure. Not to rehash old themes, but I am currently working on a book project about the “secret spirit” in Freemasonry. In this book, I am less interested in tracking a secret influence historically as I am in drawing to the consciousness of modern-day Masons many extant esoteric elements, symbolic and instructive, which are currently part of Masonic ceremonial, but which are often ignored or forgotten. What follows in this blog post is a sketch of some of that research, which will be fleshed out in the book.

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René Guénon and the Primordial Tradition

owlThe following is a brief synopsis and some personal remarks on the book Rene Guenon and the Future of the West (1987) by Robin Waterfield.

Rene Guenon was born November 15, 1886 in Blois, Loir-et-Cher, France to parents who were landowners, who counted on their vineyards and wine-growing skills to sustain their livelihood. Guenon went to a Catholic school and excelled at mathematics and philosophy.

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The Villa of the Mysteries

topThe Villa of the Mysteries or Villa dei Misteri is a well-preserved Roman Villa in Pompeii originally dating from the 2nd century BC. The present layout is thought to be set somewhere between 70 and 60 BC, and the frescoes in the initiation chamber may date to around ca. 60 AD. The villa suffered only minor damage from the eruption of Vesuvius in 79 AD. The room in the villa known as the initiation chamber is decorated with two dozen life-size figures engaged in what is usually considered to be an initiation ritual into the mysteries of Dionysus.

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One Nation, Under The Great Architect of the Universe

GWThe political climate in America is one of bitter tension and strife. Of the many issues out there inspiring Americans to wage war against each other lately, the one I think about most often is the divide between scientific materialism and fundamentalist Christianity. In my opinion this is the central set of ideas underlying the structure of our nation—i.e., freedom of rational thought, with supreme faith and dependence on God. What’s most perplexing, perhaps, is that both views seem to have a valid argument for laying claim to ideological ownership of this country, but only when taken separately, rather than as a unity. The United States of America is a two-sided enigma—on the one hand we have the powerful separation between church and state, and on the other, the idea of America’s divine providence, that we are “one nation under God, indivisible, with liberty and justice for all.”

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