“What Do You Mean Esoteric Freemasonry?” Guest Post by Sir Joaquin Munoz

hermes-trismegistus-little-alchemyAntoine Faivre and Christine Rhone (2010) develop a general taxonomy of Western esotericism in their short text Western Esotericism: A Concise History. Their designations are extremely helpful for the new student seeking to understand the ideas, concepts and challenges presented in the study of esotericism, for the very reasons Faivre and Rhone point out. Because the term Western Esotericism means so many things to so many people, it can be challenging to a new learner interested in the subjects contained therein.

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Guest Review of the 2016 High Council Meeting in Louisville By Sir Knight J. Munoz

“Wisdom and the understanding of the true nature of reality” is an intensely monumental undertaking, and one which has been at the heart of esoteric study since its inception. Attempts to understand the world around us encompass many realms and disciplines and have emanated from a multitude of traditions and cultures. For the newly made aspirant, any attempt to examine these traditions can feel immensely overwhelming. There are many of them, they are all so thick with material and history, and they often agree and contradict each other, sometimes in ways which can be difficult to clearly understand. Where to start? What does one pursue? Is there a “right” path, which thus renders some explorations pointless and others more likely to support the attainment of “wisdom and the understanding of the true nature of reality?”

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Guest Review of the 2016 Minnesota York Rite Retreat By Sir Knight J. Munoz

sacred-spaceOne of the most challenging aspects for me as a new Freemason has been the balance between the practical and the philosophical in the work of the Craft. The practical contains many components and ranges from the direct, immediate work of the ritual, lectures, and the processes around the conferral of degrees. Depending on the practices of your Lodge, this could include the use of mechanisms such as the Chamber of Reflection, a moment for meditation at the beginning of meetings, and certain additions or adaptations to the ritual work such as music, lighting, and incense to develop the atmosphere.

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René Guénon and the Primordial Tradition

owlThe following is a brief synopsis and some personal remarks on the book Rene Guenon and the Future of the West (1987) by Robin Waterfield.

Rene Guenon was born November 15, 1886 in Blois, Loir-et-Cher, France to parents who were landowners, who counted on their vineyards and wine-growing skills to sustain their livelihood. Guenon went to a Catholic school and excelled at mathematics and philosophy.

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The Misuse/Use of “Hazing” in Masonic Ritual

I attended a Masonic conference where the use of what some Masonic presenters termed “hazing” was illustrated from European rituals and from the Masonic rituals of old manuscripts. There was a question as to what the reason was for having activities resembling “hazing” in Masonic ritual, and why were they so prevalent in the past, and still more popular outside the USA? These Masonic presenters, who are the top Masonic scholars in American Masonry (I shall not name them, as they were simply doing their job as good scholars: speculating on things, that is), seemed themselves puzzled over the inclusion of the “hazing” elements of the ritual. They spoke at length about how these kinds of activities had been abused in the past, how certain Masons had not the good sense to exercise their restraint and good judgement when performing these parts of the ritual.

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